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Friday, 1 October 2021

Raised beach ridges in Bathurst Inlet, Arctic Canada


 Now this is the sort of thing that brings great joy to an old codger like me, having spent to much of my research life pondering on the wonders of raised marine features on coasts subject to isostatic recovery.........



3 comments:

Dave Maynard said...

Would you like to indicate the different features on these images?
I always find it difficult to know which is the base or top of raised beaches, although a close examination will always help.

Dave

BRIAN JOHN said...

Dave -- regular shingle or pebble ridges like this can't really be anything else than beach ridges, either associated with a lake shore or a sea shore. They need to be horizontal of course. If you look at them closely you usually find that the finer sediment fractions have been washed out. You can also find raised delta terraces in places where there was a plentiful sediment supply during isostatic uplift. In Greenland in 1962 we studied a huge "raised delta staircase" with terrace "steps" all the way up to 101m above sea level. The best raised beach ridges tend to be in embayments. On exposed headlands you may find a "washing limit" which represents the highest shoreline -- with undisturbed till or slope deposits above the line and "washed material"m from which the fines have been removed down below. Hills with caps of undisturbed till above the marine limit in Sweden are called "kalottberg" summits. You can find plenty of other posts on this blog by using the search facility....

BRIAN JOHN said...

Take a look at this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8JVcEc95dSM

You don't really need to understand Swedish.....