THE BOOK
Some of the ideas discussed in this blog are published in my book called "The Bluestone Enigma" -- available by post and through good bookshops everywhere. Bad bookshops might not have it....
To order, click
HERE

Saturday, 24 September 2011

Now the botanists get in on the act...


In May Julie made one of the finds of the year when she discovered a new inland colony of Pale Dog-violet (Viola lactea) in the north of the county at Craig Rhosyfelin, Crosswell on a steep south-east facing slope of gorse and heather at SN116360. There were about a 100 plants present in the heath, which was regularly burnt and grazed by ponies.

Actually this report is a few years old, but it certainly looks like a very pretty violet!

4 comments:

Barrie Foster said...

Did the ponies eat, shoot and leave after burning?

BRIAN JOHN said...

We have very clever ponies around these parts -- no problem at all with multi-tasking.

Tony H said...

Except most of the ponies these days have to wear trusses, for health and safety reasons.

BRIAN JOHN said...

One interesting thing comes out of all this frivolity. If the vegetation on the rocky spur has been burnt regularly -- maybe over several centuries -- I wonder what the impact may have been on the breakdown of rock faces at the so-called "quarry site"??