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Monday, 14 September 2015

UK's Top 50 Quaternary Sites



Hot off the press!  Published today -- a new booklet from the Quaternary Research Association which is a fantastic teaching resource.  The top 50 Quaternary sites in the UK -- well, actually they got such a response from contributors that there are 80 sites, but the more the merrier......

Feel free to browse happily -- it's amazing what a diversity of Quaternary sites we have in this country.  Probably most of your favourites are in there somewhere.  There is a handy list which you can browse through, with hyperlinks to those sites you want to look at.  Mercifully, the descriptions are short and pretty non-technical.

https://www.qra.org.uk/top-50-quaternary-websites/

4 comments:

Dave Maynard said...

Very interesting and curious to see how many of these sites I have nearly visited, or been within a few miles. My next family visits to Cornwall will have some specific targets now!

The Giant's Rock at Porthleven will be the first of these, I will try to send some pictures.

If was CRyf was in the next watershed would it be also part of the Gwaun-Jordanston Meltwater Channel? I guess the Nyfer/Nevern valley also has many similarities.

Dave

BRIAN JOHN said...

Yes, Giant's Rock is rather interesting -- we have discussed it before. And yes, all the valleys in this part of Pembs seem to have been affected by powerful meltwater action, some subglacially and some not. There is a very complex history, probably spread across several glaciations. The orientations or alignments of some channel sections are quite problematical, and I am beginning to think that at some stage there really was a Preseli Ice Cap which was big enough to have an effect on the landscape. Watch this space......

TonyH said...

I've recently signed up for a West Country Geology website which I find to be quite interesting - the Mendips are included. It also covers Geology further afield e.g. a Pembrokeshire field trip was recently mentioned; also. the new species of hominid found in a cave in South Africa:-


geologywestcountry.blogspot.co.uk/

AG said...

AlexG

Thanks Tony, Interesting site. from one of their posts, Thought this was rather good.

http://www.bloomberg.com/graphics/2015-whats-warming-the-world/

cheers