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Wednesday, 20 August 2014

Another evening of jolly tales from the Stone Age.....


Here we go again -- the latest blockbuster from MPP will be on 17th Sept 2014 (presumably at the end of the 2014 dig?) at Castell Henllys, which is the site of the National Park's Iron Age Village.  (Not far from Castell Mawr, as it happens.)   I think we know what he'll be saying....

See what I mean about the National Park now being completely absorbed into the process of myth propagation for commercial purposes?  Note that the entry fee this time is £3.50.....  and Rhosyfelin is, as we assumed, being promoted as a key archaeological site of local and even global significance.  Hmmm.....

I somehow doubt that I'll be getting a response from Phil Bennett to that letter I wrote!

11 comments:

Jon Morris said...

See what I mean about the National Park now being completely absorbed into the process of myth propagation for commercial purposes?  Note that the entry fee this time is £3.50..... 

Not sure about the myth thing Brian. Seems to me he's just presenting whatever they have found. Perhaps it encourages volunteers to help out during digs? Even at best case, it's difficult to see a workable commercial aspect to this type of archaeological investigation.

The entrance fee seems exceptionally low, so I guess that it must reflect the demand. If there were a hidden commercial agenda, the fee would probably have been set at zero rather than this sum.

BRIAN JOHN said...

£3.50 is a lot for this part of the world. Most public lectures etc cost about £2 to get in..... but maybe times are hard in the NPA -- and probably they reckon that by the rules of supply and demand they can get away with it.....

How would free entry fit into a cunning commercial plan? generally, in cunning commercial plans, you seek to turn a profit.

Take it from me, Jon, that the NPA is flagging up Rhosyfelin with great gusto. Extra car-parking provided at the roadside etc -- the information panel comes next, just you wait and see......

TonyH said...

Looks to me like The "X - Factor" is coming to North Pembrokeshire. With open - shirted MPP stepping into the spotlight as humble Simon Cowell. A clear bargain at £3-50.Will there be bickering from the judges? That's up to the more sound - thinking folk of West Wales - let THEM be the judge!

Jon Morris said...

£3.50 is a lot for this part of the world. Most public lectures etc cost about £2 to get in..... but maybe times are hard in the NPA -- and probably they reckon that by the rules of supply and demand they can get away with it.....

Gosh.. didn't realise that! I'm probably a bit out of touch on this lecture series lark. RILKO charged £40 for that lecture day (I was the last speaker and did Stonehenge of course) so I guess that works out about the sameish. Great fun to do once in a blue moon.

Free entry is when you're selling something else or when a NPO is doing it.

Take it from me, Jon, that the NPA is flagging up Rhosyfelin with great gusto. Extra car-parking provided at the roadside etc -- the information panel comes next, just you wait and see...

Cool! Got to be good for the local economy Brian.

BRIAN JOHN said...

RILCO -- what's that, Jon?

Jon Morris said...

Hi Brian

RILKO is the Research Into Lost Knowledge Organisation, who are an educational trust. They do lectures and so on about this sort of thing, usually in London. Here's a link to their conference page: (I was last speaker)

http://www.rilko.net/EZ/rilko/rilko/page31.php

The film that's referred to (which uses my work to describe a part of the sequence of what these monuments might have been for) is due for cinema release October 10 in Chicago.

It all went very well on the day. Got two rounds of applause. I believe that RILKO have decided to make the lecture available by DVD or some other means.

Helen said...

Speaking of MPP, this article at Smithsonian Magazine appears to suggest yet another theory:

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/what-lies-beneath-Stonehenge-180952437/?all

"How did the bluestones, which weigh between four and eight tons apiece, arrive at the site, nearly 5,000 years ago, from 170 miles away in North Wales? Land or sea? Both alternatives explode with possibilities, and nobody has an impregnable theory. Mike Parker Pearson of University College London is working on a new idea that the bluestones might have been lifted onto huge wooden lattices and carried by dozens of men to the site."

Although, the proviso seems pertinent:

"But it's just a theory. We can’t know, definitively. We can only have better-informed questions."

In the words of the daughter of a friend: "The plop thickens".

BRIAN JOHN said...

Thanks Helen -- I really like that quote -- "The plop thickens....." !! Indeed it does....

The Smithsonian used to promote serious science. 170 miles? North Wales? Hmmm...

But the MPP theory about the stones being physically lifted and carried was doing the rounds last year -- I think this is what he has been proposing in his recent lectures.

chris johnson said...

By coincidence I read the Smithsonian piece today because it promised to tell what has been learned by extensive ground radar research in recent years. Some interesting discoveries are hinted at.

AG said...

So carried on wooden lattice?

Even if we assume a heavy rucksack weight for the individual load(that I could carry when young) for a fit man of 100lbs/50kilos?

That's approx 40 men for a 4ton rock and 80men for an 8 ton rock.

That's not including the weight of the lattice!
A rather complicated design for the lattice, not to mention coordinating the movements of 40-80 men across such terrain!

The plop thickens indeed!

Why don't these people test their theories using basic mathematics and physical principles first!

Before spouting off about them?

AG said...

So carried on wooden lattice?

Even if we assume a heavy rucksack weight for the individual load(that I could carry when young) for a fit man of 100lbs/50kilos?

That's approx 40 men for a 4ton rock and 80men for an 8 ton rock.

That's not including the weight of the lattice!
A rather complicated design for the lattice, not to mention coordinating the movements of 40-80 men across such terrain!

The plop thickens indeed!

Why don't these people test their theories using basic mathematics and physical principles first!

Before spouting off about them?