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Thursday, 25 June 2015

New image of the Ramsey Sound trench

Back in 2012 I posted a piece about those amazing 3D images of the Ramsey Sound trench:

http://brian-mountainman.blogspot.co.uk/2012/04/glacial-landforms-ramsey-island.html

So today it was a pleasant surprise to receive an even better image from Dr Paul Evans of Cardiff University.  Paul can be reached here:  EvansPS3@cardiff.ac.uk

He has kindly offered to make the data files for this new high-res image available to anybody who may be interested.

Here is the new image:


The trench is a real puzzle -- it is most unusual to find a trench or canyon of this type which is closed at both ends.  The excavation of the trench cannot be laid simply at the door of tidal scour.  And glacial erosion in this situation is not all that likely either, given that the prevailing direction of ice movement in both the Anglian and Devensian glaciations is most likely to have been perpendicular to the alignment of the trench, and not parallel with it.  So there must be some structural influences at play.  An interesting geomorphological enigma.

4 comments:

TonyH said...

How deep is the Ramsay Sound trench or canyon? We ought to send MPP down there to check the floor for "smoking guns", ie Neolithic/ Bronze Age boats with Rhosyfelin proto - orthostats conveniently still aboard. Surely the Smithsonian Institute/ National Geographic could financially afford this, it's a "sure - fire" winner, with plenty of kudos!

How's your snorkling, Myris? Your highly specialised geological sampling and identification skills may come in useful here. Also, the Greeks may have been here first, as rumoured offthe northern tip of Scotland.

BRIAN JOHN said...

Maximum water depth is 66m -- but I have to admit that I don't know if the image shows water depth or depth of the bedrock floor. Two very different things. Will ask Paul.

Paul Evans said...

Hi Brian,
I can confirm that this image shows seabed elevations relative to Chart Datum, rather than depth below the water surface.
Happy to discuss further if you wish...
Regards,
Paul

Paul Evans said...

Hi Brian,
I can confirm that this image shows seabed elevations relative to Chart Datum, rather than depth below the water surface.
Happy to discuss further if you wish...
Regards,
Paul