THE BOOK
Some of the ideas discussed in this blog are published in my book called "The Bluestone Enigma" -- available by post and through good bookshops everywhere. Bad bookshops might not have it....
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Wednesday, 14 January 2015

The Ixer Compendium




As a service to mankind, here is a link to all the published papers by Rob and his colleagues.  Most of the recent papers relate to the bluestones at Stonehenge and in Pembrokeshire.  No excuses for anybody to plead ignorance of the main findings -- even if the detailed petrography is often rather challenging for mere mortals......

Thanks to Rob and the Academia people for making these papers accessible.  A lot of my old papers are on a similar website called Researchgate.

You can either read the papers online or download them.  Happy reading!

http://independent.academia.edu/RobertIxer

I realised that not all the key papers are there, available for download.  Here is a fuller list, thanks to Rosie's web site!

Richard E. Bevins, Rob A Ixer and Nick J.G.Pearce 2014. Carn Goedog is the likely major source of Stonehenge doleritic bluestones: evidence based on compatible element geochemistry and Principal Component Analysis. Journal of Archaeological Science, 42, 179-193.

Rob Ixer and Richard Bevins 2013. Chips off the old block:the Stonehenge debitage dilemma. Archaeology in Wales, 52, 11-22

Richard E. Bevins and Rob A. Ixer 2013 Carn Alw as a source of the rhyolitic component of the Stonehenge bluestones: a critical reappraisal of the petrographical account of H.H.Thomas. Journal of Archaeological Science, 40, 3293-3301.

Rob A. Ixer and Richard E. Bevins, with a contribution from Mike Pitts. 2013. A re-examination of rhyolitic bluestone ‘debitage’ from the Heelstone and other areas within the Stonehenge Landscape. Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Magazine, 106, 1-15.
 
Richard E. Bevins, Rob A. Ixer, Peter C. Webb and John S. Watson. 2012. Provenancing the rhyolitic and dacitic components of the Stonehenge landscape bluestone lithology: new petrographical and geochemical evidence. Journal of Archaeological Science,39, 1005-1019.

Rob Ixer and Richard Bevins. 2011. Craig Rhos-y-felin, Pont Saeson is the dominant source of the Stonehenge rhyolitic ‘debitage’. Archaeology in Wales, 50, 21-31.

Richard E. Bevins, Nick J.P.Pearce and Rob A.Ixer. 2011. Stonehenge rhyolitic bluestone sources and the application of zircon chemistry as a new tool for provenancing rhyolitic lithics. Journal of Archaeological Science, 38, 605-622.

Rob.A.Ixer and Richard E. Bevins. 2011. The detailed petrography of six orthostats from the bluestone circle, Stonehenge. Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Magazine, 104, 1-14.

Rob.A.Ixer and Richard E. Bevins. 2010. The petrography, affinity and provenance of lithics from the Cursus Field, Stonehenge. Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Magazine, 103, 1-15 

Timothy Darvill, Geoffrey Wainwright, Kayt Armstrong and Rob Ixer 2008. Strumble-Preselli ancient communities and environment study (SPACES): Sixth Report 2007-08. Archaeology in Wales. 48, 47-55.

T.Darvill, R.V. Davis, D.M.Evan, R.A. Ixer and G.Wainwright 2006. Strumble-Preselli ancient communities and environment study (SPACES): Fifth Report 2006. Archaeology in Wales. 46, 100-107.


R.A.Ixer and P.Turner. 2006. A detailed re-examination of the petrography of the Altar Stone and other non-sarsen sandstones from Stonehenge as a guide to their provenance. Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Magazine, 99, 1-15 

11 comments:

TonyH said...

But surely that is Pete Seeger, the folk musician (Little Boxes, Turn! Turn! Turn! Turn!, Where Have All The Flower People Gone?), presumably just before playing to a very selective post - Neolithic audience??

BRIAN JOHN said...

No doubt the owner of the sweater will get in touch to clarify his real identity......

Myris of Alexandria. said...

Ah the photo to astound is 229 page 257 of Stonehenge Complete by Chippendale.A black curley-haired, black sunglasses and green duffle coat. Looking unworldly almost Jovian.
I wore and so loved my green duffle coat throughout my u/g days and eventually left in a hotel in SW Ireland as a post grad.

TonyH said...

Wasn't it Scotland's Donovan who made the duffle coat fashionable on a visit to the hippies' Guru Maharishi in India?

Myris of Alexandria said...

Loved that man, addictively twee.
They call me Mellow Yellow oh yea.
Dylan eat your heart out.
Both still alive I think.
The thing about duffle coats and I now wear a Harrods suede one is the pockets are huge, hip flask, sandwiches and a paperback can be packed into one-strains it.
M

Myris of Alexandria said...

Loved that man, addictively twee.
They call me Mellow Yellow oh yea.
Dylan eat your heart out.
Both still alive I think.
The thing about duffle coats and I now wear a Harrods suede one is the pockets are huge, hip flask, sandwiches and a paperback can be packed into one-strains it.
M

Alex Gee said...

Thank you very much.

TonyH said...

Does the Harrods duffle bag come with the built - in, primed, hip flask?

Always recall Bob Dylan, circa 1965, looking very suspiciously at very - new - kid - on - the block Donavan ("is this guy taking the mickey?" - they were both wearing the same U.S. Folk Singer caps) during the first Dylan - nervous Beatle encounter in some London hotel. Donovan lives in California still, I think. So not in Sunny Goodge Street, one of his more jazzy songs.

Myris of Alexandria said...

No I could only afford the cheap coat (we are not talking about duffle bags).
But a lovely idea I bet they would go for it. You however are taking Liberty's. Now that would be an accessorised coat.
I have realised my coat would probably go well in their vintage
Clothing after a good clean.
Built to last.
M
M

TonyH said...

Whoops! Did, of course, mean to type "duffle coat".

I did have a beloved duffle BAG which accompanied me for many years to my bi - weekly swimming sessions. Eventually disintegrated, succumbing through its proximity to humid changing rooms and chlorinated water.

I'm certain this would never happen to Joanna Lumley's Harrod's duffle bag.

IXER, I discover, is an Ancient Surname worthy of a separate Post, or even Blogsite.

Myris of Alexandria said...

Yes Ixer's have been around in England for over 1000 years, there are about 100 blood Ixers at present.
Oddly enough there are three living Robert Ixers and possibly in the 70s
There were four.
The men are either not very fertile,
or only produce girls.
Our branch goes with me as my brother has a girl and I two Pekes.
I prefer the A/S explanation of 'scabby' to the Norman French explanation of 'ice-cold' - how appropriate for this blog though.
M