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Monday, 12 March 2012

Beware of the zooming ice block....


Another of the wonderful images from the Glaciers Online web site.  This is from Monch, in Switzerland -- a 55 tonne ice block has fallen from the ice cliff with such force that it has been able to slide well out onto a relatively gentle and compact snow surface.

Never trust a hanging glacier, that's what I say...........

By the way, how do you get umlauts on this computer?!

8 comments:

chris johnson said...

Is that a Greek I see standing next to the block?

BRIAN JOHN said...

It's quite possible -- they are reputed to be very fond of living dangerously.....

Jon Morris said...

Easiest way is to cut and paste the character from a program such as a word processor: Example done this way at

http://charniere-des-cieux.blogspot.com/

For most word processors the selection is insert>special character.. then pick from list.

BRIAN JOHN said...

Relevance, Jon?

Jon Morris said...

How to get umlauts: a pair of dots above a vowel.

BRIAN JOHN said...

Ah! I'm with you -- thanks! Yes, there are some shortcuts on the computer -- haven't got round to learning where they are. My wife (being Swedish) is expert at it, since she has all those extra letters to cope with....

Jon Morris said...

I'm thinking of learning the proper way to do shortcuts myself, but only if interest in the French version keeps going.

The other, slightly quicker, shortcuts are done by pressing
the ALT key then using the keypad to punch in the character code.

I guess this is a bit off the subject of Stonehenge? After the news stories of recent months, I think everyone's a bit stonehenged-out.

T Hinchliffe said...

Alternatively, "Beware of Greeks bearing gifts" (for he could have another unusual glacial theory hidden behind his ice block).

'Never trust a hanging glacier'?? Well my surname is, fittingly, highly geographical. The 'Hinch' element derives from a word similar to 'hanging', meaning steep slope; and the 'liffe' (often also 'cliffe') has a similar origin.